Ke Oho o ka Malanai

"The Malanai wind followed us wherever we went"

Today we went to Kawainui Marsh -- Pōhaku o Hauwahine. We sat on the pōhaku and listened to ʻAnakala Kīheiʻs story of Hi‘iaka and Hauwahine. Hi‘iaka and her friend Wahine‘ōma“o were standing here and saw two beautiful women swimming in the water. Hi‘iaka knew it was Hauwahine the mo‘o, and when she chanted "‘O Kailua," Hauwahine and her friend disappeared. Then it was our turn to chant "‘O Kailua." After that, we walked to the pond to see the ‘alae ‘ula, ‘alae ke‘oke‘o, and koloa. When we stood there, I felt like I was soaring. 

-- Malia Medeiros


The story: One day Hi‘iaka and her friend Wahine‘ōma‘o were walking through Kailua. When they got to Pōhaku o Hauwahine, they saw two or three women swimming in the pond. Wahine‘ōma‘o said, "Look at those beautiful women," but Hi‘iaka said, "Those arenʻt women; they are mo‘o." "They are women; you can see them; they are women," said Wahine‘ōma‘o who was stubborn. "No, they are the mo‘o guardians of Kawainui," said Hi‘iaka; "I can prove it. When I chant, they will disappear or turn into something else." "Okay, you can try it, but I still donʻt believe you," said Wahine‘ōma‘o. So Hi‘iaka chanted "‘O Kailua i ke Oho o ka Malanai," and when the moʻo heard this, they turned into birds and flew away. "Oh," said Wahine‘ōma‘o. 

-- Leina‘ala Medeiros

Tonight we made a style of lei called "hilo." What you do first is take half of a microwaved ti leaf and twist the middle until it curves. When it does, you put the loop around your second toe and start twisting the two sides together. Whenever a leaf becomes half the size of your hand, you add another leaf and keep on going. When you come to the end and all your leaves are used up, you make a loop and tie a knot at the end. But donʻt pull too hard or your end leaves will break and mess up your lei.

-- Kawaipunahele Manise


Today we got the hilo lei we made last night and drove to the parking lot behind the First Hawaiian Bank. That is where they are going to put the new bank. But as they were digging [test trenches], they ran into iwi. Bones. Old Hawaiian Bones. They stopped digging, and now they are going to move the bank away from the iwi and build a wall around the bones so they will be protected. These bones, the [archaeologists] said, might be about 700 years old. From the 1300s. Thatʻs old. What we did was take our slippers off outside, then ‘Anake Māpu chanted an oli before we entered and another one as we entered. Then we chanted "‘O Kailua" and placed our lei on top of one of the three places where the iwi were buried. Then after we placed our lei we chanted "‘O Kailua" once more. Then ‘Anake Māpu chanted as we walked out. I am really happy we got to do this. I feel like I have helped and cared for someone I did not even know.

-- Kailana Milne 


It makes me happy to think that nā iwi kūpuna might have chanted "‘O Kailua" when they were alive. That makes me feel connected to them somehow.

-- Ku‘upua Wengler-Cheski


Next we went to Pu‘u o Ehu [the hillside at the entrance to the town]. From one side of the hill, we could look back and see where we were at Pōhaku o Hauwahine. From the other, we looked down at Kailua Town, and I couldnʻt recognize anything from the top. It took me two minutes to recognize the stores and streets. I could feel the Malanai winds and felt refreshed.

-- Heather Burns

Next we were off on a winding path to the top of a mountain called Ka‘iwa. At  the top we saw a pillbox that was used as a lookout place in World War II. Some people there were very disrespectful. They were littering, and a few girls even wrote graffiti all over the top of the pillbox with a big red pen. I didnʻt like that; it was as if they came into our home and started littering and drawing on our walls.

-- Ku‘upua Wengler-Cheski





Every place we went we felt the Malanai wind; it really blew our hair up and back at the top of Ka‘iwa. Ka‘iwa is a girl mountain and the boy mountain Ahiki is the third peak of Olomana. They liked each other, so to show his love for her, Ahiki moved away from the other peaks to be closer to Ka‘iwa. After we saw this higher view of Kailua and Lanikai [Ka‘ōhao], we went to the beach for a cool swim. We also played games at the beach and talked, and then we came back to write.

-- Makana Kahalewale

After visiting the iwi kūpuna, we went to breakfast. I ate pancakes and two link sausages. They were great. We ate at the place called Cinnamons. Their food looks, smells, and tastes awesome.

-- Malia Medeiros


After breakfast we went back to the hālau for our last activity: we learned to make bracelets out of lauhala. It was confusing, but fun. You had to go over and under, loop around and tug.

-- Kawaipunahele Manise 


My bracelet started out brown and ended up lighter. It was fun, but it took a while to prepare and make.

-- Heather Burns


I never got to finish my bracelet, but I only got ------------------------ that much left. I think weʻll get them back next class. I accidentally put the dull side up on the last strip. Oh well, You can see all the lauhala veins now. After we finished, we packed up all of our stuff and got ready to leave. Then when it was 1:00, and we said good-bye to 'Anake Māpu and ‘Anakala Kīhei. I had an awesome time on this Kailua sleepover. I am very glad I came.

-- Kailana Milne